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snakes

avoiding snakes

Oct 6th 2018

British man dies from sea snake bite in Australia

A British man has died after being bitten by a sea snake on a fishing trawler in Australia, police have said.

The man, 23, thought to be a backpacker, had just pulled up a net off the coast of the Northern Territory when he was bitten about 09:00 local time on Thursday (23:00 GMT Wednesday).

Emergency crews were called to the boat, near island Groote Eylandt, but were unable to save the man.

It may be the first recorded death from a sea snake in Australia.

The man was working on the trawler and was bitten by the sea snake while pulling the net onto the boat, police said.

The man's body was taken to the mainland town of Borroloola on Thursday. Northern Territory Police said a post-mortem would be conducted.

A British High Commission spokesperson said: "We are supporting the family of a British man who has died in the Northern Territory and are in contact with the Australian authorities."

Authorities have not said which species may have caused the death.

'Tragically unlucky'

Sea snakes are highly venomous, but because of their limited contact with humans, bites are relatively rare.

Australia is home to 30 of 70 known species, according to the Australian Institute of Marine Science.

Blanche D'Anastasi, who researches the animal at James Cook University, said she believed Australia had no previously recorded deaths from sea snakes.

§  Snake bites a 'global health priority'

§  Venomous animals not Australia's deadliest

Associate Prof Bryan Fry, from University of Queensland, described it as a "tragically unlucky accident".

"By and large they are very gentle animals, and people do go scuba diving with them all the time," he told the BBC.

"But in a fishing trawler situation, where they've been potentially dragged through the water in a net, they will come up injured and perhaps looking to lash out."

Sea snakes are often encountered by fishing crews in the region, Ms D'Anastasi said.

According to research published last year, snakes were responsible for 27 deaths in Australia between 2000 and 2013.

 

Oct 7th 2017

News Man v. Snake: 26-Foot-Long Python Loses Epic Battle By Stephanie Pappas, Live Science Contributor | October 5, 2017 02:53pm ET 0 0 MORE A village in Indonesia enjoyed a snake-meat feast this weekend after a resident wrestled and killed a 26-foot-long (7.8 meters) python. The python was of the species Malopython reticulatus, saNid Donal Boyer, the curator of herpetology at the Wildlife Conservation Society. Also known as the reticulated python, the snake is found all over Southeast Asia and has been reported to grow up to 30 feet (9.1 m) long, though snakes of that size are "quite rare," Boyer said. Just last year, a 26.2-foot-long (8 m) reticulated python was captured at a construction site in Malaysia, though the reptile died three days later while laying an egg. According to the BBC, a security guard named Robert Nababan stumbled across the snake on a road inside a palm oil plantation in the Sumatran district of Batang Gansal. [In Images: Hungry Python Eats Porcupine Whole] "I tried to catch it, my hand was bitten, and I managed to wrestle it," Nababan told Detik, an Indonesian news outlet. A government official told the BBC that Nababan's arm was severely injured by the bite and might have to be amputated. M. reticulatus usually eats mice and other small- to medium-size prey, including domesticated animals like chickens, pigs and dogs. In Singapore, they've been known to chow down on invasive iguanas, according to a case report published in January 2016 in the journal Herpetological Review. They constrict their prey to suffocate it before swallowing it. And the larger the snake, the larger the prey it can take. The python that attacked Nababan was provoked, Boyer said, and likely tried to bite and squeeze the guard to defend itself — not to make a meal. But reticulated pythons have very rarely been known to feed on humans. On another palm oil plantation in West Sulawesi, Indonesia, a 25-year-old man was found inside the belly of a 23-foot-long (7 m) python in March.    A 2011 study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reported that in the past, reticulated pythons have menaced humans in the Philippines. Data on the hunter-gatherer Agta people from 1976 revealed 16 cases of predatory reticulated python attacks over the previous decades. Two of the fatalities were children, but the pythons also constricted and killed two adults. A third adult died from an infected python bite.   This weekend's attack had a happier result, at least for the humans involved. Nababan killed the snake with the help of some nearby villagers, according to the BBC, and it was subsequently fried and eaten. Original article on Live Science.  Get More from Our Newsletter Editor's Recommendations Photos: This Python Chowed Down on 3 Deer Photos: Giant Pythons Invade Everglades Beastly Feasts: Amazing Photos of Animals and Their Prey Author Bio Stephanie Pappas, Live Science Contributor Stephanie interned as a science writer at Stanford University Medical School, and also interned at ScienceNow magazine and the Santa Cruz Sentinel. She has a bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of South Carolina and a graduate certificate in science writing from the University of California, Santa Cruz. Stephanie Pappas, Live Science Contributor on Science Newsletter: Subscribe submit Follow Us Most Popular 3,200-Year-Old Stone Inscription Tells of Trojan Prince, Sea People Facts About Beryllium Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week The Most A village in Indonesia enjoyed a snake-meat feast this weekend after a resident wrestled and killed a 26-foot-long (7.8 meters) python. The python was of the species Malopython reticulatus, said Donal Boyer, the curator of herpetology at the Wildlife Conservation Society. Also known as the reticulated python, the snake is found all over Southeast Asia and has been reported to grow up to 30 feet (9.1 m) long, though snakes of that size are "quite rare," Boyer said. Just last year, a 26.2-foot-long (8 m) reticulated python was captured at a construction site in Malaysia, though the reptile died three days later while laying an egg. According to the BBC, a security guard named Robert Nababan stumbled across the snake on a road inside a palm oil plantation in the Sumatran district of Batang Gansal. [In Images: Hungry Python Eats Porcupine Whole] "I tried to catch it, my hand was bitten, and I managed to wrestle it," Nababan told Detik, an Indonesian news outlet. A government official told the BBC that Nababan's arm was severely injured by the bite and might have to be amputated. M. reticulatus usually eats mice and other small- to medium-size prey, including domesticated animals like chickens, pigs and dogs. In Singapore, they've been known to chow down on invasive iguanas, according to a case report published in January 2016 in the journal Herpetological Review. They constrict their prey to suffocate it before swallowing it. And the larger the snake, the larger the prey it can take. The python that attacked Nababan was provoked, Boyer said, and likely tried to bite and squeeze the guard to defend itself — not to make a meal. But reticulated pythons have very rarely been known to feed on humans. On another palm oil plantation in West Sulawesi, Indonesia, a 25-year-old man was found inside the belly of a 23-foot-long (7 m) python in March.    A 2011 study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reported that in the past, reticulated pythons have menaced humans in the Philippines. Data on the hunter-gatherer Agta people from 1976 revealed 16 cases of predatory reticulated python attacks over the previous decades. Two of the fatalities were children, but the pythons also constricted and killed two adults. A third adult died from an infected python bite.   This weekend's attack had a happier result, at least for the humans involved. Nababan killed the snake with the help of some nearby villagers, according to the BBC, and it was subsequently fried and eaten

 

25.9.17

A police investigation has been launched after an exotic animal lover was found dead next to his pet python which was loose from its cage.

Police said snake handler Dan Brandon was found dead at his home with one of his pet pythons close to him on August 25.

The 31-year-old, who lived with his parents, succumbed to "serious injuries" at his room in the Hampshire home where he kept all of his snakes.

The death is being treated as non-suspicious but officers are investigating whether he was fatally injured by the snake.

According to experts, pythons only kill what they eat. Pythons have killed humans before, however this is believed to be the first ever case in the UK.

A spokesman for the Hampshire Police told The Sun: "We were called to an address in Church Crookham.

"A 31-year-old man had suffered serious injuries and died at the scene.

"The death is not being treated as suspicious at this stage. A file will be prepared for the coroner."

August 11 2017

Take particular note of this good advice.

With the onset of warmer weather. It will quite likely be a bigger problem in the future.

Snakes in general are shy creatures, and will get out of your way if possible

do not tease them. You may live to regret it, or you may die regretting it

Most people find it hard to believe that snakes have fanciers that sometimes keep them in their houses as pets.

This is a picture of the damage caused by a snakes bite I have deliberately chosen some moderate damage but there are some ghastly pictures on Google.

There are many types of snakes and lots of different legless lizards the difference is that the Lizards have eyelids and ears so are easily distinguished, snakes come in all sizes from very small to the giant Anacondas and can be colored from all black to bands of various colors, their habitats range from deserts to tropical forests, from grass to trees and there are many water snakes.

Not all snakes are venomous but most are, boa constrictors kill their prey by squeezing the life out of them, the prey usually die from suffocation, the venom of most types of snakes are different but they have some similarities, some just rot the flesh away and others attack the nervous system and stop the heart.

Medical help is very good these days if you can get to the hospital in time they may carry stocks of antivenin, but it’s best if they know what type of snake attacked you, there are many different snakes and many types of antivenin, it is interesting how they produce this antivenin they do it by injecting an animal, a cow or a goat with a diluted shot of venom again and again until the animal produces enough antibodies, these are then collected and processed and made into antivenin, the main difficulty is there are so many varieties.

The first aid treatment is to immobilise the affected area with a splint if possible and elevate the area above the heart level then immediately go to the nearest hospital and telephone to warn them of your arrival, take a photograph if possible of the snake identification purposes, the hospital might advise you to go to another treatment centre where they have better snakebite facilities.

You will find snakes in nearly every country of the world the few exceptions that I'm aware of are Ireland and New Zealand, banana growers actually encourage snakes because they kill the rats that eat the bananas, many countries in the East enjoy eating snakes as part of their normal diet along with dogs, frogs, insects and practically anything else they can catch.

You should take sensible precautions when walking in the countryside in grass or woods, do not wear open toe sandals, protect your legs with some substantial trousers and if necessary secure several layers of newspaper around your lower legs, make a noise as you walk along, most snakes will hear you coming and get out of your way. This sort of protection is also good for ticks another nasty little pest.

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