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toxic-shock

Toxic-shock syndrome

Please have a look here

http://www.cbdpure.com?AFFID=341507

April 24th 2018

Organic tampons, cups no safer against toxic shock, study reveals

Organic cotton tampons are often advertised as safer alternatives, but a study Friday said they are not better than regular tampons at preventing toxic shock syndrome.

Menstrual cups can also raise the risk of toxic shock, and should be boiled in between uses, said the report in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Women have long been advised to change tampons regularly to avoid the risk of toxic shock syndrome, a rare but life-threatening condition that arises from a bacterial infection.

Symptoms may include fever, vomiting, rash, muscle aches and organ failure.

In recent years, a number of new female hygiene products have hit the market, including tampons made from organic cotton and menstrual cups that can be rinsed between uses.

To see how they measured up, researchers tested 11 kinds of tampons and four menstrual cups in the lab to study their effect on growth of a pathogen called Staphylococcus aureus, and also toxic shock toxin 1 (TSST-1) production.

They inserted the tampons and cups into plastic bags, injected a liquid and a trace of bacteria isolated from a patient who had toxic shock in 2014, then sealed the bags and left them for eight hours.

They found it didn't seem to matter what kind of material was in the tampon, rather it was the amount of air in between the fibers that seemed to raise the risk of bacterial growth.

"Our results did not support the hypothesis suggesting that tampons composed exclusively of organic cotton could be intrinsically safer than those made of mixed cotton and rayon," said Gerard Lina, professor of microbiology at University Claude Bernard, in Lyon, France.

"We observed that space between the fibers that contributes to intake of air in the vagina also represents the major site of S. aureus growth and TSST-1 production."

Meanwhile, menstrual cups seemed to allow even more bacteria to grow than tampons, again likely due to the additional air involved.

At least one case has been documented in scientific literature of a woman coming down with toxic shock after using a menstrual cup.

"Over the years, it was postulated that perhaps if tampons were made from natural materials, toxic shock would be averted. The new research recently published clearly illustrates that this is not true," said Adi Davidov, director of gynecology and robotic surgery at Staten Island University Hospital in New York, who was not involved in the study.

"Toxic shock can occur with any tampon material and even more frequently with the menstrual cups."

According to Jill Rabin, co-chief of the division of ambulatory care at Northwell Health, a network of medical providers in New York, women should change tampons frequently.

"If tampons and menstrual cups are used be sure to see your doctor at the first sign of any fever, chills or rash, and of course, remove the cup or tampon immediately."

Feb 13th 2018

Teen who almost died of toxic shock syndrome from a tampon shares her symptoms.

A 16-year-old girl from New Zealand is speaking out about the symptoms she suffered after contracting toxic shock syndrome, a life-threatening condition often linked to tampons where bacteria enters the body and releases harmful toxins.

Grace Morgan, from Whangarei, a city on New Zealand's north island, shared her symptoms with the New Zealand Heraldin a bid to raise awareness among other women about the condition. She's eager to remind people to seek urgent medical attention if they notice any of the same signs - because that's what saved her life.

Grace first noticed her unusual symptoms while at work in July last year. "I just started having this pain over my whole body, kind of like an ache," she told the newspaper.

The aching developed overnight into a rash which started on her stomach and spread to her chest, neck and thighs, along with a high temperature, vomiting and diarrhoea.

When Grace went to visit a doctor the next day, he was concerned about her high heart rate and her low blood pressure, which was so low it wasn't even registering on the machine. When no immediate improvements were seen with medication, she was quickly sent to hospital.

There, Grace was diagnosed with toxic shock syndrome. Just days after her symptoms began, she was transferred to intensive care as her liver, kidney and heart all began to fail.

Thankfully, with the right medication and the care of doctors and nurses, Grace made a recovery, but she knows how close she was to losing her life.

While Grace knew there was a risk of leaving tampons in for too long, she insists she never did. Her doctors also told her that length of time is irrelevant - simply using tampons alone can put people at risk.

The risk, however, is low; as the NHS is clear to point out on its website. It's not realistic, or necessary, to stop using tampons because of this minimal risk, but as Grace proved - it is important to be aware of your body and to act on any unusual symptoms quickly.

The whites of the eyes, lips and tongue turning a bright red is one of the symptoms

Dec 30th 2017

Plus other womens subjects.

Many of us learned the bulk of information about puberty and periods during a few sexual education classes in middle school, and through few hushed conversations with peers that followed. Though hundreds of millions of people menstruate, the topic is treated as taboo across the globe. Not only are periods treated as off-limits, but vaginas as a whole are highly stigmatized — in real life and in film. Due to this discomfort surrounding reproductive health, many people feel too ashamed to speak about their vaginal health, and too ashamed to ask important questions about it.

This leads to a lot of misinformation and misunderstanding surrounding vaginal health — a 2016 survey from non-profit organization The Eve Appeal revealed that 44 percent of British women were unable to identify the vagina or reproductive system on an image. Moreover, another 2016 study from the sex toy brand Womanizer showed people had many misconceptions about their own reproductive systems, with 73 percent of participants polling they would opt not see an OB/GYN over an ingrown hair — even if it had the potential to actually be an STI (like a herpes sore).

Having an understanding of your natural bodily functions and vagina is super important to maintaining your health, so here's eight things your OB/GYN wish you knew.

1Douching is bad for your vaginal health

"Most OB/GYNs highly advised against douching at all. In some cases, douching can do more harm than good," Dr. Lakeisha Richardson, an OB/GYN, tells Bustle. According to the Office on Women's Health, around one in five American women between 15 and 44 douche — aka, clean out their vaginas with water, soap, or a mix of fluids. Despite how common douching is, OB/GYNs agree across the board that the practice is pretty bad for your vaginal health. Douching is linked to STIs, urinary tract infections, and even a rise in toxic chemicals called phthalates.

Dr. Richardson adds that any vaginal odor could be caused by a pH imbalance in your vagina. "Think of your vagina as a delicate ecosystem that needs to be maintained at a pH of 3.5 to 4.5," she explains. "Lots of women douche to feel clean and fresh, but understand that water has a pH of 7 — so while it might make you feel fresh for a short time, it won’t solve the problem."

2All those "pH-balancing" soaps are *also* harmful to vaginal health

Vaginas have their own bacteria, just like your gut, that keeps it healthy, balanced, and protected. Though the tampon aisle is full of vaginal soaps that claim to fix your vagina's pH level, doctors agree these body washes aren't going to help. "Overall health can affect vaginal pH as well as hormonal status. Women who are well hydrated, follow a well balanced diet which includes things like yogurt, and practice safe sex will have a normal vaginal pH. Harsh soaps used within the vulvar and vaginal areas can be harmful," Dr. Rinku Mehta, the medical director of Frisco Institute for Reproductive Medicine, told Teen Vogue.

Odorous vaginal discharge is not every now and again, but if it is consistent, it may indicate you have an infection. Either way, skip the pH soap next time you feel like you smell, and just let your body naturally clean out bad bacteria. If you feel like you really need a pH-balancing vaginal product, Dr. Richardson says she recommends RepHresh to her patients — a clinically-approved, odor eliminating gel that can be bought over-the-counter.

3Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) isn't as common as you might think

Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is a bacterial infection that causes your immune system to go into overdrive, and if left unchecked, can lead to multi-organ failure. Tampons have been associated for an increased risk of TSS, because if you leave them in your body for longer than recommended, they can easily breed bacteria that can cause an infection. However, it is far less common than you might think — Toxic Shock Syndrome is considered rare, with only 1 in 100,000 menstruating people in the U.S. being diagnosed with the bacterial infection annually, according to the CDC. Changing your tampons as recommended and maintaining your vaginal health can help you avoid any scares.

4Birth control affects everyone differently

Not everyone will react to birth control the same way, and what works for you and your hormones may not work for someone else. Though everyone produces the same hormones, many variables — including stress, age, and overall health — can cause varying hormone levels in everyone.

"The right birth control method depends on the patient," says Dr. Richardson. "Birth control is only effective when it is used correctly, and a lot of women have gotten pregnant while taking birth control because they were not taking it correctly."

So, don't stress if your friend has a great experience on the pill, but you prefer the NuvaRing: it's completely normal to have various reactions, especially if you have a mental or physical illness that already contributes to hormone imbalances.  

5Birth Control isn't just for, well, birth control

While on the topic of birth control, it's important to note it doesn't just have a sole purpose of controlling your fertility. Dr. Richardson tells Bustle birth control can be used to "regulate abnormal cycles, and "can help shorten the length of your menstrual cycle and decrease the amount of blood loss during menses." She adds it can additionally be used to treat reproductive health issues such as endometriosis and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Some people even use it to treat acne. So even if you are not sexually active, it may be helpful to consult your OB/GYN about birth control if you are dealing with any on the above issues.

6You CAN get pregnant on your period

Though it is a common myth that you absolutely can't get pregnant while you are on your period, there is a slight possibility that you, well, can. It all depends on ovulation (aka, the part of your cycle when you are most fertile), and where you are in your menstrual cycle. Having a shorter (28-day) cycle, or a cycle that is unpredictable, can increase your likelihood of pregnancy during period sex. Also, sex at the end of your period is more risky in regards to pregnancy, since sperm can live inside you for up to five days. Your chances of getting pregnant from period sex are low, but taking the regular precautions is still a good call, especially if you do not want any kind of pregnancy scare.

7Don't ignore persistent menstrual pain

Experiencing mild to moderate abdominal cramping while on your period is completely normal, but you should see your OB/GYN if the cramping is persistent or severe. Endometriosis, a common reproductive health issues affects around one in ten American women between the ages of 15 and 44. So while chances are you just have normal period pain, it doesn't hurt to be aware it could be caused by a more serious condition.

8Lastly, don't skip your annual exam or routine STI testing

I know this may seem obvious, but never skip your annual exam or routine STI testing. "Women who delay their annual exams and pap smears are more likely to be diagnosed with an advanced cervical cancer than women who continue to see their doctor on a regular basis," says Dr. Richardson, explaining that even women who have received a Bilateral Tubal Ligation (a form of permanent birth control) still need to see their OB/GYN regularly.

Additionally, Dr. Richardson adds, "One of the most important things women can do for their reproductive health is to protect themselves when starting new relationships. If you are in a relationship, still get tested every six to 12 months."

Your OB/GYN is truly the only person with the proper training, tools, and equipment to determine the full scope of your reproductive health needs. Your health is too important to ignore, so never be ashamed to ask your OB/GYN any questions, or raise the smallest of concerns.

And there is more

We are often labelled a "complicated" sex, and whether this is true or not of our psyche, I would certainly agree when it comes to our reproductive system. We are constantly balancing our delicate hormones to achieve harmony, and very often this equilibrium is thrown out of kilter. It is really important to know when these changes are normal, and when further investigation is needed. 

Unfortunately, I find too many women anxious and embarrassed about seeing their GP, suffering with issues that could have been easily treated or more worryingly, sitting on problems that may have serious implications. I cannot reassure women enough, that as GPs we have seen and heard it all, so if you are ever concerned or have any of the following symptoms, please see your doctor. 

1. Breast lumps

It can be difficult to know what all those lumps and bumps are in our breasts, but reassuringly only 10% of women who have lumps will have cancer. Usually it's just normal connective breast tissue clumping together (called a fibroadenoma), or sometimes a benign cyst or fatty lump, but if you do ever feel a lump in your breast you should always see your doctor. It is fairly common to get cysts that come and go depending on your menstrual cycle, and if your GP thinks it feels benign they may suggest reviewing you to see if that lump persists after your period.

However, if you are post-menopausal or your doctor is not sure what's causing the lump, they will refer you to the breast clinic for more tests. A cancerous lump often feels hard and craggy, and doesn't move easily under the skin when touched. There may also be lymph nodes in your armpits or a change in the overlying skin in the breast or to the nipple.

It is also worth noting lumps aren't the only sign of breast cancer, so if you notice any changes it is worth getting checked out.

2. Abnormal bleeding

There are lots of factors that affect our periods, including weight loss, exercise and stress. Often it will correct itself and treatment isn't necessary, however if your periods continue to be irregular, heavier, or lasting longer than normal, you should discuss this with your GP. 

Furthermore, if you are getting any bleeding after sex, or between your periods, a visit to your GP is important as these can be signs of STDs or abnormalities to the cervix, womb or ovaries. If you have gone through your menopause and start bleeding again, you must also see your GP, as it is abnormal to bleed after the menopause and it may be a sign of a cancer in the womb. 

3. Bloating

Unfortunately, when it comes to ovarian cancer, the signs and symptoms can be very vague, and the primary symptom of bloating mimics other conditions like IBS or PMS. I suggest that if you have felt bloated most days for three weeks or more, then you should see your GP. They may ask about associated symptoms like pelvic pain, feeling full or having a loss of appetite, increased urinary urgency or frequency and weight loss, and then carry out an examination, blood tests or an ultrasound. 

4. Unusual discharge

Vaginal discharge is normal, and we need it to keep the vagina moist and to protect us from developing infections. It is meant to be clear or white in colour and shouldn't be malodourous. It can vary in its thickness depending on when in your cycle you are. But, if this changes and it becomes a different colour, or becomes smelly or more profuse, it may be a sign of a problem. 

The causes can include common infections like bacterial vaginosis or thrush, which can often be treated easily with over the counter medications. However, it may also be a sign of a sexually transmitted infection like chlamydia, gonorrhoea, herpes or trichomoniasis. If left untreated, these STIs can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease which is an infection of the reproductive organs, which can be serious and lead to infertility. If these infections are ruled out as a cause of your change in discharge, your GP may need to consider growths (including cancer) to the womb or cervix as a potential cause, so it is important not to ignore this symptom.

Dec 21st 2017

Deborah Kotz, a spokeswoman for the Food and Drug Administration, said that the agency considers tampons that have been approved for marketing to be safe for women.

Kotz said that all tampons, which are class II (or intermediate risk) devices, must receive clearance from the agency to be sold in the United States.

As part of the clearance process, Kotz said, tampon manufacturers are urged to provide the FDA with “a list of component materials (such as chemicals, additives, finishing agents used) and a risk analysis concerning vaginal injury, tissue reactions and infections.

“Manufacturers are also advised to conduct microbiology testing to demonstrate that the tampon does not enhance the growth of certain bacteria or other organisms, including the bacteria known to cause toxic shock syndrome, and demonstrate that tampons meet their claimed absorbency level.”

Vice reported in 2015 that Wasser's family filed a lawsuit against the Kimberly-Clark Corp., which manufacturers and distributes Kotex tampons in the United States; the suit also named the grocery stores where Wasser used to buy the products. They were “negligently, wantonly, recklessly, tortuously, and unlawfully responsible in some manner,” the suit argued.

When asked about the lawsuit this week, Wasser said she couldn't comment. Kimberly-Clark said only that “the matter has been resolved.”

Wasser, 29, shared her story in 2015 with Vice, and retold it in a recent op-ed for InStyle.

“My name is Lauren Wasser,” she started, “and the life-changing journey I'm about to share will uncover the truth behind why I lost my right leg and the toes of my left foot — and why a tampon was the cause of it all.”

Wasser, from Los Angeles, does not remember much about the moments after she fell ill that Wednesday in October 2012 — she does not remember her fever reaching 107 degrees, or the massive heart attack she suffered, or the days she spent in a medically induced coma after police called to check on her found Wasser on her bedroom floor, facedown.

She does not remember being rushed to an emergency room still wearing the last tampon that she would ever put in, or testing positive for signs of toxic shock syndrome.

She does not remember being placed on life support, either.

But, Wasser said, she does remember the agony she felt before and for a long time after she lost her leg due to complications from her illness.

In a video interview with StyleLikeU, Wasser recalled the moment she said her surgical team wrote “yes” on one leg and “no” on the other.

“Like 'yes,' this is the one that's going and 'no,' this is the one that we're keeping,” she said through tears. “And to see that visually on your leg, and then my mom kissing my leg and knowing that's the last time, it was crazy.”

Because her body did not respond well during the surgery, she said, doctors could not give her pain medication for 24 hours after the procedure.

“Immediately I woke up from the amputation and I felt every single thing that happened for 24 hours,” she said. “Screaming my head off. Throwing s---. I mean, it was f------ hell. I was miserable. I hated everyone. I hated everything. I hated myself.”

She said she no longer wanted to live.

Wasser wrote in the InStyle op-ed that she wants to be an advocate for other women:

The letters TSS that I once read in the fine print buried on the bottom of tampon boxes soon came to define me. TSS — Toxic Shock Syndrome: a potentially fatal complication of certain types of bacterial infections. The vagina is the most absorbent part of a woman’s body, and you place a tampon in that place that can bring with it chemicals, toxins. They say that it's rare, and for the longest time I felt alone being a victim of TSS. It not only left physical wounds but mental ones. I battled PTSD and fell into a dark depression after what happened. I melted into my bed, and life just sort of stopped.

It wasn’t until my girlfriend, photographer Jennifer Rovero, took hundreds of pictures of me as I recovered from my amputations that things started to change. The process was a sort of therapy for me, which Jennifer coined as “photo therapy.” I grew to see the beauty and strength in myself and my journey through the lens of her camera. While we were shooting, we often asked young girls if they have ever heard of TSS or if they believed that it’s real. The majority of them said no.

In the coming months, she added: “I’m inevitably going to have my other leg amputated.”

“I'm in excruciating pain every day,” she told The Post, explaining that once she has her left leg amputated, she believes she will be able to run again — pain-free.

“It is what it is,” she said, adding that there needs to be more education about TSS. She said her hope it that other women will “be more aware of what they're putting inside their bodies.”

Feb 10th 2017

A student thought her severe headache was caused by exam stress – but a tampon had actually given her a life-threatening infection.

Phoebee Bambury, 19, from Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, spent almost two weeks in hospital after contracting toxic shock syndrome last month.

She had just finished her exams for her degree in pharmacy, at Keele University, and was in the library preparing for the new term, when she started to feel unwell.

She explained: “I was feeling really awful. I went downstairs at the library and started to vomit so I went home to my student house.

“I thought it was just because it was exam season and I'd been really stressed. I was a bit run down and it was that time of year where everyone gets sick.”

Trying to shake off her illness, she went home to relax before getting ready to celebrate her granddad George Ellis, 78, stepdad, Mark Chadwick, 49, and boyfriend Scott Lawton, 24, joint birthdays with her family at a restaurant in Stoke-on-Trent.

But as the party came to an end, she started burning up and her concerned mum, office manager Jane Chadwick, 49, told her to spend the night at her boyfriend’s house in Packmoor, Staffordshire, in case she got worse.

During the night, she woke up and knew something was seriously wrong.

She said: “I was shivering really uncontrollably. All of my muscles were aching and I just really didn't feel well at all.”

But Phoebee was able to connect the dots and realised her symptoms sounded familiar.

“It was ticking over in my head and I thought I knew what it sounded like,” she said. “I went and got a box of tampons and read out all the symptoms of toxic shock syndrome. Everything matched.

“My boyfriend said it was probably just a bug or a virus, but I really didn't want to risk it. My friend's mum died from toxic shock and so did my dad's girlfriend's niece.

"I didn't know them personally, but I had been told stories about it and I knew how bad it can get.”

She immediately phoned 111 to ask for advice and they told her to go straight to hospital.

Knowing that getting medical help quickly if it was TSS was important, she phoned her grandparents George and Mavis Ellis who took her to the Royal Stoke University Hospital.

After speaking to a triage nurse, she was immediately admitted and hooked up to a drip.

“I was still shaking and felt really cold but my temperature was 39.7 C. I was in agony - I had a really bad headache and I had really bad stomach pains. It was frightening because I felt so awful,” she said.

For weeks, Phoebee had been suffering heavy menstrual bleeding but, as concerned doctors investigated the cause of her symptoms, scans ruled out any gynaecological problems.

Diagnosed with TSS – a rare infection which is caused by Staphylococcus or Streptococcus bacteria getting into the body’s deep tissue and releasing toxins that attack internal organs - Phoebee was given a cocktail of antibiotics and painkillers.

Her body continued to react to the infection, causing days of vomiting, fevers and her body to swell so much, she put on 5kg because of the fluid.

After 12 days in hospital, she was released and, despite her ordeal, she was glad that she got to hospital in time.

Although she says she was always careful to use tampons correctly, doctors believe her body reacted to them during her heavy bleeding, causing TSS.

“I have been having really, really heavy bleeding, so I have been using them a lot for quite a well. I never leave them in for more than eight hours and I use ones that are right for my flow, but I was really unlucky.

“I have had my boyfriend driving around town looking for the right size before - I know all the things to do but it happened any way.

“It could have been so much worse though. People lose limbs or even die. At least I connected the dots and recognised the symptoms, because a lot of people just think it's a really bad cold,” she explained.

Phoebee hopes to make a full recovery, but the infection has caused the skin all over her body to dry out and flake off.

Now recovering at home, she is speaking out to warn other women about the dangers of TSS.

She added: “The best advice would be not to use tampons at all, but I know for a lot of people that isn't an option. It's important to make yourself aware of the symptoms and if you do get them, get straight to a hospital.

“It is better to be safe than sorry. Even if it is a virus, it's better for them to check it out than for you to end up with multiple organ failure.”

Symptoms of TSS include a high temperature of 39C (102.2F) or above; flu-like symptoms, such as a headache, chills, muscle aches, a sore throat and a cough; feeling and being sick; diarrhoea; a widespread sunburn-like rash; the whites of the eyes, lips and tongue turning a bright red; dizziness or fainting; breathing difficulties; confusion and drowsiness.

The NHS said: “TSS is a medical emergency.

“While these symptoms could be due an illness other than TSS, it's important to contact your GP, local out of hours servicece-auto-ge or NHS 111 as soon as possible if you have a combination of these symptoms.

“It's very unlikely that you have TSS, but these symptoms shouldn't be ignored.”

She immediately phoned 111 to ask for advice and they told her to go straight to hospital.

Knowing that getting medical help quickly if it was TSS was important, she phoned her grandparents George and Mavis Ellis who took her to the Royal Stoke University Hospital.

After speaking to a triage nurse, she was immediately admitted and hooked up to a drip.

“I was still shaking and felt really cold but my temperature was 39.7 C. I was in agony - I had a really bad headache and I had really bad stomach pains. It was frightening because I felt so awful,” she said.

For weeks, Phoebee had been suffering heavy menstrual bleeding but, as concerned doctors investigated the cause of her symptoms, scans ruled out any gynaecological problems.

Diagnosed with TSS – a rare infection which is caused by Staphylococcus or Streptococcus bacteria getting into the body’s deep tissue and releasing toxins that attack internal organs - Phoebee was given a cocktail of antibiotics and painkillers.

Her body continued to react to the infection, causing days of vomiting, fevers and her body to swell so much, she put on 5kg because of the fluid.

After 12 days in hospital, she was released and, despite her ordeal, she was glad that she got to hospital in time.

Although she says she was always careful to use tampons correctly, doctors believe her body reacted to them during her heavy bleeding, causing TSS.

“I have been having really, really heavy bleeding, so I have been using them a lot for quite a well. I never leave them in for more than eight hours and I use ones that are right for my flow, but I was really unlucky.

“I have had my boyfriend driving around town looking for the right size before - I know all the things to do but it happened any way.

“It could have been so much worse though. People lose limbs or even die. At least I connected the dots and recognised the symptoms, because a lot of people just think it's a really bad cold,” she explained.

Phoebee hopes to make a full recovery, but the infection has caused the skin all over her body to dry out and flake off.

Now recovering at home, she is speaking out to warn other women about the dangers of TSS.

She added: “The best advice would be not to use tampons at all, but I know for a lot of people that isn't an option. It's important to make yourself aware of the symptoms and if you do get them, get straight to a hospital.

“It is better to be safe than sorry. Even if it is a virus, it's better for them to check it out than for you to end up with multiple organ failure.”

Symptoms of TSS include a high temperature of 39C (102.2F) or above; flu-like symptoms, such as a headache, chills, muscle aches, a sore throat and a cough; feeling and being sick; diarrhoea; a widespread sunburn-like rash; the whites of the eyes, lips and tongue turning a bright red; dizziness or fainting; breathing difficulties; confusion and drowsiness.

The NHS said: “TSS is a medical emergency.

“While these symptoms could be due an illness other than TSS, it's important to contact your GP, local out of hours servicece-auto-ge or NHS 111 as soon as possible if you have a combination of these symptoms.

“It's very unlikely that you have TSS, but these symptoms shouldn't be ignored.”

Toxic-shock syndrome

This is a very serious condition with a fatality rate approximately 50% so it’s not something to be taken lightly, usually associated with the misuse of tampons but there are other reasons why you might encounter this unusual condition.

You will be more at risk if you are a diabetic, if you have recently undergone surgery, you are suffering from chickenpox also alcoholics are known to be more at risk.

The symptoms for toxic-shock syndrome are very similar to the symptoms for influenza but if they occur soon after surgery or skin injury or if you suspect you have been misusing your tampons you should contact your doctor without delay.

The doctor should take a blood sample to check your kidney and liver function they will also take swabs from your throat, cervix and vagina, These samples are analyzed for the bacteria that cause toxic shock syndrome.

You will probably finish up in the hospital’s intensive care unit on an antibiotic drip and subject to 24 hour monitoring after being thoroughly examined, poked and prodded to make sure that you haven’t still got some foreign body still inside you.

You will more than likely be put on medicines to stabilize blood pressure, and you will get some gamma globulin injections and a fluid drip to fight dehydration

If you’re a major organs are affected you may suffer from liver or kidney failure, heart failure or the serious condition of general shock

You can do your best to avoid toxic shock by changing your tampon every 4 to 8 hours, changing to a sanitary napkin on light flow days, using a low absorbency tampons sanitary napkin and washing your hands frequently with a hand cleaner not just soap.

If you have any breaks in your skin grazing or cuts you must keep them clean and change your dressings often.

Do not be reluctant to pass this information on to the younger members of your family, it still amazes me to find out that some mothers do not show their little girl infants the way to wipe their bottoms, i.e. always wipe from front to back, make sure that the younger female members of your family are aware of the 4 to 8 hour maximum time period before changing their tampons if it is applicable.

Do not rely on them picking this vital information up from their friends or schoolmates, remember the Chinese whisper and make sure they get the correct information.

- -

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